all ornithischians, all the time

A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and scales »

tyrannosaurslair:

Abstract:

Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits from northeastern China have yielded varied theropod dinosaurs bearing feathers. Filamentous integumentary structures have also been described in ornithischian dinosaurs, but whether these filaments can be regarded as part of the evolutionary lineage toward feathers remains controversial. Here we describe a new basal neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of Siberia with small scales around the distal hindlimb, larger imbricated scales around the tail, monofilaments around the head and the thorax, and more complex featherlike structures around the humerus, the femur, and the tibia. The discovery of these branched integumentary structures outside theropods suggests that featherlike structures coexisted with scales and were potentially widespread among the entire dinosaur clade; feathers may thus have been present in the earliest dinosaurs.

Pay-walled, but a link to pictures

rhamphotheca:

Siberian Discovery Suggests Almost All Dinosaurs Were Feathered
Jurassic fossils may mean that feathers were all in the family.
by Dan Vergano
Almost all dinosaurs were probably covered in feathers, Siberian fossils of a tufted, two-legged running dinosaur dating from roughly 160 million years ago suggest.
Over the past two decades, discoveries in China have produced at least five species of feathered dinosaurs. But they all belonged to the theropod group of “raptor” dinosaurs, ancestors of modern birds.
Now in a discovery reported by an international team in the journal Science, the new dinosaur species, Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus, suggests that feathers were all in the family. That’s because the newly unearthed 4.5-ft-long (1.5 m) two-legged runner was an “ornithischian” beaked dinosaur, belonging to a group ancestrally distinct from past theropod discoveries…
(read more: National Geographic)
illustration by Andrey Atuchin

rhamphotheca:

Siberian Discovery Suggests Almost All Dinosaurs Were Feathered

Jurassic fossils may mean that feathers were all in the family.

by Dan Vergano

Almost all dinosaurs were probably covered in feathers, Siberian fossils of a tufted, two-legged running dinosaur dating from roughly 160 million years ago suggest.

Over the past two decades, discoveries in China have produced at least five species of feathered dinosaurs. But they all belonged to the theropod group of “raptor” dinosaurs, ancestors of modern birds.

Now in a discovery reported by an international team in the journal Science, the new dinosaur species, Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus, suggests that feathers were all in the family. That’s because the newly unearthed 4.5-ft-long (1.5 m) two-legged runner was an “ornithischian” beaked dinosaur, belonging to a group ancestrally distinct from past theropod discoveries…

(read more: National Geographic)

illustration by Andrey Atuchin

perpetualartistsblock:

An idea I doodled in a notebook (eventually I’ll get around to posting those some day, maybe) and finally made a drawing of I’m decently pleased with: a Stegosaurus nest. The Stegosaurus looks slightly wonky, but that’s mostly the foreshortening and the ~5-8 minutes put into it talking.
Can’t say I recall much art detailing stegosaur nests, but I obviously doubt this is the first.

perpetualartistsblock:

An idea I doodled in a notebook (eventually I’ll get around to posting those some day, maybe) and finally made a drawing of I’m decently pleased with: a Stegosaurus nest. The Stegosaurus looks slightly wonky, but that’s mostly the foreshortening and the ~5-8 minutes put into it talking.

Can’t say I recall much art detailing stegosaur nests, but I obviously doubt this is the first.

dino-sours:

I absolutely love this painting by Luis Rey. As far as I’m concerned, this is the new definitive take on Triceratops.

Presented here in the unfeathered T. rex version that appeared in Dinosaur Art and the feathered T. rex version that appeared in The Big Golden Book of Dinosaurs.